Anak Krakatau

Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)

In early 2009 Anak Krakatau restarted a period of intense Strombolian activity, so that Marco took part in a VolcanoDiscovery expedition to Rakata Island during the first week of June 2009. The weather was much more unstable than in November 2007. This caused spectacular thunderstorms which cleared the atmosphere and produced perfect views of the tropical night sky.

Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)
A powerful thunderstorm is approaching from Sumatra: lightning strikes the sea beyond Anak Krakatau.
Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)
Anak's eruptions illuminate a deck of low clouds and are reflected by the sea which, at the moment, is still calm.
Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)
Bolts of lightning strike the sea between Anak and Palau Panjang and are reflected by a sea, which becomes increasingly rougher.
Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)
Anak Krakatau in eruption disappears in a sheet of rain while poweful lightning activity continues and even hits the crater.
Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)
The passing storm has cleared the air: Big Dipper points towards Anak Krakatau in eruption, exactly north of Palau Rakata. The pole star is almost exactly behind the volcano, but just under the horizon.
Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)
A peaceful evening with a perfectly calm sea. Big Dipper rotates around Anak's crater, the center of this small world. Palau Sertung, Sebesi and Panjang in the background
Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)
The constellation of Ophiucus sets beyond a shower of red bombs erupted by Anak Krakatau. Photo taken from the pine wood on the eastern side of Anak Krakatau on the morning of 6 June.
Storms and Stars over Krakatau (4. - 8. June 2009)
Below a thunderstorm at 500m from the active vent of Anak Krakatau. Lightning freezes the shape of the ash cloud a few minutes after a Strombolian eruption has occurred.
Photos by Marco Fulle taken with 10mm, 20mm and 50mm lenses (reflex digicam with 16x24mm sensor).